India in pictures

A morning walk

8:38 AM

bandstand promenade in Mumbai, early in the morning.

The Winter days are slowly settling in Mumbai, it is drier, and mornings are pleasantly cool. Last weekend, it was the perfect time to go for a morning walk by the sea front.
This is a picture taken in Bandra, on the Bandstand promenade. Like all seafront promenade in Mumbai, it sees a lot of activity in the morning, with people going for a job, a walk, a stroll or doing some yoga.
In December and January, people really just go to just catch the chilly sea breeze, be it at sunrise, or sunset.

To conclude this busy week I had, this is my picture of India for this Sunday. A reminder we all need to slow down and enjoy life from time to time.

13 comments

  1. 10C & drizzling here in Nepal. Brrrrrrr!

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  2. We had a little rain yesterday in some areas, and this morning was the first morning I needed my socks to stay warm inside, but not yet to the point of trading my short sleeves for long ones.

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    1. This is the first rain we've had since September & it was much needed as it was getting a bit smoggy/smoky due to all the agricultural burning going on around here.
      That golden stollen recipe turned out fine. I made it with raisins, dates, walnuts & dried apple bits along with the pumpkin. My only complaint was that it tasted more like a scone instead of any stollen I've ever tasted- which is understandable as the dough uses baking powder instead of the traditional yeast.

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    2. Yeah the lack of yeast in a stolen would affect its texture and taste, no doubt. I will have to try it out still, sounds interesting. I have been in baking mode the past 2 weeks, and had a big Christmas party at my place last Thursday, so now I am taking a bit of a break :-)

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    3. Anonymous9:37 AM

      There was rain in Delhi. Winter has just arrived. Soon, there will be fog,uggh. Winter mornings are horrible. Winter afternoons are glorious, basking in the sun and munching on peanuts, gur patti and oranges. These days ofcourse open spaces are little hard to find. Winter is also the time when prices of vegetables are low. So, lots of spinach, mustard etc. BTW, have you tasted the legendary Punjabi recipe Maake Ke Roti with Sarso ka Saag. It tastes heavenly with a little bit of home made butter. Little heavy on the stomach though. The roti tastes even better when it is stale.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4WYSLoxVoLg

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oBKSw5rPjIY

      Alas, in the hop and skip of life we have forgotten these little pleasures. But, I guess whatever little winter hot and humid Mubai has is a welcome relief to the residents.

      Apple

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    4. Never tasted sarson ka saag, I don't think you can even find the leaves in Mumbai.
      This morning I woke up feeling cold enough to go out a long sleeve t-shirt, the first time this season, it looks like Winter is indeed settling over North India and coastal areas. The rain we had Friday night did give place to cooler days. People do get out more in the afternoon too in Mumbai. This is actually the time of the year you will find a lot of open air festivals and special events, the rest of the year nobody is insane enough to go out for such thing :-)
      Oranges are out now, sweet and juicy, and a delight to peel while soaking in the morning chill and later sun.

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    5. Anonymous1:14 PM

      Oh, you will most probably find them with the vegetable vendors, especially those who sell only saags, spinach, mustard, methi etc. Most vegetable vendors do not keep specifically it because they keep other vegetables. We get our vegetables and fruits from weekly markets. There there are vegetable vendors who sell specifically saags and radishes. There are others who sell garlic, lemons, chilles and ginger. Some sell only coriander and mint leaves, some only potatoes and onions. They also sit on specific spots, so you know where to find what. I think Mumbai does not have weekly markets and most apartments have to depend on vegetable carts. In Delhi, weekly markets spring up on weekly days like Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday in different localities.

      Nowdays, these vendors have small machines to cut these leaves of saags into fine particles. Picking the leaves of saags is most time consuming and cumbersome. I think maaki flour is found everywhere, most flour brands do have maaki flour of their own. Thick maaki rotis taste divine in winters. Have you eaten raveris and gazak?? I think they are chikkis in Maharashtra. Reviri would be pellets of milk solid mixed with seasame

      https://www.google.co.in/search?q=gazak&biw=1366&bih=566&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=0Y-OVMztOcvbuQS79ICgBA&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ

      Winters used to be pleasant in Delhi. Now all you have is smog (smoke plus fog). It is highly injurious to asthmatic. Doctors actually advise people not to go for morning walks since the air is full of pollutants at that time and the early morning chill is disastrous for heart patients. Winters are also painful for old people with arthritis. Give me blistering summers any day, at least things are visible. Apartments, metro station, traffic lights everything becomes invisible.

      Apple

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    6. Yeah we have the vegetable sellers operating from the back of tempos in my area, they sell a mix of everything common and very few leafy stuff, the one that sell methi and coriander isn't even selling good quality stuff, so I rely on the supermarket for a lot of things. There might be markets in South Mumbai, but I live in the suburbs, so heading there is a stretch.

      We get hit by the smog in January, but fortunately it dissipates very quickly and never really settles, I think it doesn't really get cold enough for it and being on an island we get constant wind currents from the sea, from one side or another, so while the pollution is still nasty, it doesn't lingers on no end in one spot too long.

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    7. Anonymous11:16 AM

      There was time when all kinds of vendors roamed the neighborhoods. People who repaired pressure cookers, made cots, quilts, sharpened knives, repaired the grooves of sil battas (batan and grind stone). Most fascinating was the work of those who made quilts. They first cleaned the cotton with an equipment with hand. Then they skillfully stuff them inside the cloth to make quilts. Here they are using machine to trash the cotton, earlier it was done using a heavy bow with a metallic sting. the bow was hung on the roof or nail with some kind of spring like thing. Then string was pulled and released repeatedly to thrash the cotton, making awful noise.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xJAabi1LFYw

      Even the work of cot makers using jute ropes to make cots or those who repaired folding cots of steel with plastic stripes.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJeaBGfFm6g

      The next generation would not even know that such skills existed.

      Can you believe there was even a guy to clean toilets. He roamed the neighborhood with a cloth brush and a bottle of acid. Apparently, people did not want to clean their toilets. This was because one contact with toilet would mean mandatory bath, before you can enter the kitchen or pooja room. In earlier day s, it you dared to enter the kitchen or pooja room without bath or after going to the loo, you had it.

      Now, with small flats and attach bathrooms, people have gotten over their uneasiness with toilets. Now, we have toilets just next to kitchen due to space constrains. Absolute cleanness is difficult to maintain in fast pace life. Older people still find it difficult taking bath in a bathroom which already has a toilet. Traditionally, toilets and bathrooms were separate. As we move towards community living to individual nuclear families, many such things are undergoing changes though slowly.

      Apple


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    8. I am a trained decorator specialised in upholstery and soft furnishing, in Switzerland it is a noble profession and the labour cost is high, so we really restaured antique armchairs, sofas and did high end work at customer's place. I did use that machine you speak of on many many occasion. The French term is "Cardeuse" in English I think it translates as a mechanical combing machine, it helps separate the fiber of cotton, or even coir and horsehair to fluff it up since it usually gets delivered to has packed and compacted and cannot be used as it is in a padding work. I also know all the mattress stitch points. I never did the kind of work used on most charpoy bed, but we did have a kind of webbing and binding involving springs in sofas and chairs that is equally crafty. As you said, they are things that the future generation will not know about, the profession in question is a dying one in Switzerland too, only the super rich with heirloom furnitures worth saving really pay for that kind of service these days, my boss lived from paycheck to paycheck most months. It was still a very interesting job to learn for myself, even if I dont think I would have ever practiced it the old way if I stayed in Geneva, very few from my generation of decorator do.

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    9. Anonymous1:05 PM

      When I was young, they were still doing with hand with big bow like equipment with metal string. Thank god for internet. These are relics from the past, the art needs to be preserved.

      https://www.google.co.in/search?q=indian+dhunia+cleaning+cotton&biw=1366&bih=566&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=WNqPVJDWHNGNuAT044LoDA&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=J7CpjX6YR_i2XM%253A%3BoAdGMs-rrimGtM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fim.rediff.com%252Fgetahead%252F2009%252Faug%252F27slide7.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fgetahead.rediff.com%252Fslide-show%252F2009%252Faug%252F28%252Fslide-show-1-specials-things-you-rarely-see-in-india-anymore.htm%3B350%3B289

      But, people of India have found that ingenious ways to keep up with traditions. For eg, earlier if there was pooja at home, the elders were asked about the material to used and rituals. Now, you get the list from the priest, go to the shops who specialize in pooja material, hand them over the list and they provide you everything from ghee to offerings for the fire ceremony and even grains all neatly packed in miniature packs. the priest will bring the utensils and other stuff. You just need to put things in the right place. This system is of great help to those who don't have elders at the home and also short pressed for time in cities and want to organize elaborate poojas like "Satyanaryan" at their homes. We have made the process involved in our rituals more efficient to match the requirements of changing time, but we have failed to bring the same level of organization to other walks of our life.

      Apple

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  3. Beautiful! I love the cool weather :) it nice being able to use a blanket or sweater.

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    1. It is 6 am right now and I am in bed without the fan, snuggling under the blanket listening to the sound of a wind chime a neighbour has on his balcony. Feeling cosy...pure bliss. I love Einter in Mumbai

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