Recipe

Homemade Hummus

1:37 PM

Hummus is a cheap, easy to make dish that goes well with vegetables stick and toasted pita bread.

The first thing to survive Summer is to spend as little time sweating in the kitchen. That has always been my motto. I usually go by a the rule that I. The Summer, I should not be spending more than 20 minutes in the kitchen for one meal. The cooking time and resting time can be longer, as long as it doesn't tie me to the stove on no end.
It goes without saying that comes the heat and we are less hungry and have little craving for a hot meal.

Hummus, is that big solution to summer meals. It is healthy, can be made in bulk, and is super versatile. You can have it with just about anything and it can be flavoured to your taste. And, it is super easy to make.
All you need are some chickpeas (Chole) and sesame seeds. And if you know the secret of speed soaking, you don't even need to plan that meal 8 hours in advance if all you have are dry chickpeas around.


Speed soaking RULES

I urge you to try it, for all your pulses and beans soaking need. I honestly don't bother with the overnight method anymore. To speed soak any dry bean or lentils all you need to do is put them in a pan of cold water and bring it to a boil. Boil for 5 minutes before turning off the heat. Then, cover the pan with a lid for one hour and let it rest. Your pulse will be as soft that way as they would be using the long 8 hours soak.

Once they are soaked, you cook them in the pressure cooker as usual.

Let's go back to Hummus now that I gave you that handy trick.

Hummus is made of puréed chickpeas mixed with Tahini (sesame paste) and seasoning. Most gourmet store in India will sell it to you at the price of gold. That, despite the fact that all the ingredients to pull you own version are readily available in India at a fraction of the cost.
I have also seen too many recipe asking you to use store bought Tahini...say what?????
Tahini is nothing but ground sesame seeds mixed with a little sesame oil. Don't waste your money on imported one. If you have a mixie, you can make both Tahini and Hummus. I am yet to find a middle class Indian household that doesn't have a mixie around.

For my reciepe you will need :

1 cup sesame seeds and a little sesame oil for the Tahini
1 cup dry chickpeas that you will soak, cook and cool
2-3 cloves garlic
1tsp salt
A splash of olive oil
Some water

1) First, speed soak your chickpeas and then pressure cook as usual

2) while the chickpea is soaking, make your Tahini. Put your sesame seeds in the mixie and blitz to a powder. It will be slightly sticky at this point because the broken seeds will release their natural oil. Add a little sesame oil to your mix and blitz until smooth. The paste should look like some slightly runny peanut butter.

You can store your Tahini in an airtight container in the fridge, the quantity you'll yield is more than you will require for the hummus.

3) Once your chickpeas are cooked and cooled (you can speed that up by pouring cold water on them), put them in the mixie. Add the garlic, salt, olive oil, and two heaped table spoon of tahini before starting to blitz. Add a little water at a time while grinding, until you have a smooth creamy paste.

4) You hummus is now ready! Serve it with raw vegetable sticks, and bread, or even as a side to other dishes.

I gave you the base recipe, I like my hummus very garlic-y. But if you prefer a spicier version, by all mean add red chilli powder to the mix. Or herb it adding parsley. As I said it is a very versatile dish, experiment at will with it.

This recipe yield about two cups of hummus, and it stores well in an airtight container for at least a week (That is how long I have kept it so far). It stays fine in tiffins and my daughter has taken some to school as she LOVES it. We absolutely can't go wrong with hummus in this home.






9 comments

  1. Anonymous3:45 PM

    Hummus I think is middle eastern. This has influenced Indian dishes. Bengal had a lot of influence from muslim rule and I think this dish ghuguni is influenced by hummus. This is what my mum used to make. The peas are not mashed bu the consistency with the minced meat makes it like a thick paste.

    http://www.mix-and-stir.com/2013/04/mangsher-ghugni-dried-yellow-peas.html

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v350Irf5MkE

    This is what people eat while hopping from one pandal to another in Kolkata during durga pooja

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XDy8Go2JjHU

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5cT4QsLbKXw

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bOA_Ale_cXc

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lkHKqkjvn5M

    These are simple and excellent snacks on the go.

    apple

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In Switzerland we have a similar dish, but made with greenish brown flat lentils that look very similar to unpolished masoor dal. It has chunks of meat in it and it looks like a paste even though the dal isn't mashed. My mom hated that dish and never cooked it at home, I loved it and had it in school when it was served at the canteen :-)

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  2. Anonymous6:24 PM

    Lol. I agree with the gourmet store part. Seriously. You must see some of the items. I get that things like udon, seaweed sheets, black bean sauce etc aren't made locally hence catering to such products is really nice to those of us who like to experiment with continental cuisine. But you know i was really shocked to know that so many of the local grown seeds and pulses cost a bomb in these online gourmet stores. The trick is to know the local name and your kirana store wala will be.more than happy to hand it over. Just nutritionists have to wrote an article about some lesser known pulse ppl will go crazy buying it. Flax seed is really popular these days since it can be used as an egg substitute in cakes I looked up and the prices were unbelievable. When I spotted a guy at the kirana buying a pouch of flax seed for 25 rupees lol. Just the name was different. Hummus goes really well with pita bread. Or any leavened flat bread. Yummy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think gourmet stores have indeed their need when it comes to the obviously not local and impossible to find locally items, but the craze is really going out of hand. There is so much that can be made locally and at a fraction of the cost.

      I do hummus with pita bread, or when not available and too hot to bake, whole wheat remade pizza bases as it is the case in the picture above :-) in the Summer these mini pizza bases are a life saver, my kitchen gets insanely hot, baking pita bread is totally out of question.

      Delete
  3. Love love love hummus! It is so healthy and filling, I just love the flavor :)
    I do an avocado-hummus-red onion sandwich for my daughter and she just loves it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That sounds really yummy, next time I find ripe avocados I will try it.
      This is what is so wonderful about hummus, it can be eaten in som many different ways.

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  4. Anonymous7:46 PM

    Apart from hummus another famous and delicious Lebanese dip is Baba Ganoush. Roasted eggplant with tahini. I found that roasting the eggplant with tongs directly on the flame of stove instead of the oven gave a much nicer roasty flavour.
    That speed soaking totally worked. But I ended up making yummy chole in a fragrant tomato onion sauce. :) The chickpeas were too delicious to be pureed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Speed soaking is amazing, and it works with all lentils and pulses that require soaking. I use it a lot. One thing that is great with speed soaking is that it also reduce the cooking time in the pressure cooker and the pulses turn out much softer than they would have with the traditional 8 hour long soaking.

      Delete
  5. Anonymous7:47 PM

    Apart from hummus another famous and delicious Lebanese dip is Baba Ganoush. Roasted eggplant with tahini. I found that roasting the eggplant with tongs directly on the flame of stove instead of the oven gave a much nicer roasty flavour.
    That speed soaking totally worked. But I ended up making yummy chole in a fragrant tomato onion sauce. :) The chickpeas were too delicious to be pureed.

    ReplyDelete

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